A wedding day she’ll never forget - for all the wrong reasons.



There are flowers everywhere, the bride and groom wear beautiful clothes and their families look on proudly. It seems like Lily’s wedding will be the beginning of a lifetime of happiness. She will remember this day forever - but for all the wrong reasons. Watch Lily's wedding video above.

Want to know more about the issues raised in this powerful film? Read about UNICEF's work in Bangladesh and with Syrian refugees living in Lebanon.


These seven-year-old boys prove friendship knows no borders.



Meet your new friendship goals. Nawwar fled Syria as a refugee, surviving a dangerous journey across the sea and mountains. When he finally resettled in Berlin and started at a new school, Alec was there to welcome him with boundless curiosity and support. They became translators, best buddies and an example for us all.

Want some more inspiration? Here are 14 stories from the refugee crisis that will give you hope for humanity.


Two mothers, two children, two very different trips to the hospital



When we posted this short film on Facebook, it created quite a stir. The simple story of childhood vaccination provoked thousands of passionate comments about unequal access to vaccines throughout the world, plus the rights of children here in Australia. See what all the fuss is about.

UNICEF is the world's largest supplier of vaccines to developing countries. We've seen the incredible power of immunisations to save children's lives and the shocking reality that one in five children continue to miss out.

Get the facts: this infographic proves how effective vaccines are.

This Syrian girl lost her leg, her friends and her childhood. Now she’s moving forward and kicking goals - literally.



The comments on this video said it all:
 
  • "What a beautiful soul. We can all learn so much from that amazing young girl."
  • "This child gives me hope, her smile warms my heart and inspires me to happiness."
  • "If things can be finally placed in the excellent hands of wonderful young people like Saja their country will see a bright future.
Saja shows us that Syrian children are not giving up. They have a right a learn and live out their dreams. That's why UNICEF is working in Syria to enrol 2.8 million children in education this year. School will give them a safe space to cope and recover today, and the skills they'll need to rebuild their communities in the years ahead. Find out how you can help.
 

One story. Two refugees. 70 years apart.


 

Ahmed and Harry are worlds apart, separated by borders and cultures and generations of history. But as they tell their stories side-by-side, something becomes powerfully clear. They share one childhood.
 

Audrey Hepburn shares the very personal reason she became a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador

 


"I can testify to what UNICEF means to children, because I was among those who received food and medical relief right after World War II," said Audrey Hepburn when she was appointed UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador in 1989. 

Hepburn was determined to witness the struggles of children living in poverty and crisis. She travelled to more than 20 countries, reported back to international media and inspired thousands of people to take action.


Amir was born without the use of his arms or legs but nothing would stop him from creating beautiful artworks


 
"Rather than talk to other people about my pain, I would talk to these paintings," says Amir, a 16-year-old boy in Nepal. Amir can't use his arms so he deftly holds a paintbrush in his mouth and brings his dreams onto the canvas.

Amir was one of 5,000 children with disabilities who UNICEF supported after a devastating earthquake in 2015. Read more about the emergency response for children.

 

This 'peanut butter' has saved millions of lives

 


It's a simple idea that changed the world. Plumpy'nut is a high-energy peanut paste fortified with micronutrients and, over the years, it has helped millions of malnourished children to survive and recover. Get the full story.
 

Conflict in South Sudan tore these families apart for two years. This is the beautiful moment they were reunited with tears of joy.



It had been two years since Nyaneada was separated from her parents in the chaos of war and she was starting to lose hope. "I actually stopped believing that I'd ever go home and be reunited." Watch the moment everything changed.

UNICEF has helped to reunite thousands of children since conflict erupted in South Sudan. See more of this incredible work.

This couple’s trip to the hospital was totally normal, until their world fell apart.


 

It starts like any other birth in Australia: she feels the baby coming, her partner grabs their bag and starts driving to the hospital. But what if there isn't one? What if she has to give birth in the terrifying conditions which 16 million new mothers face every year?

This video surprised 5 million viewers with a very different picture of pregnancy and started an important conversation about maternal health. UNICEF believes every mother deserves to give birth in a safe space with good medical care. We support mums with supplies and skilled birth attendants so they can experience the joy of a healthy baby. You can help.

Imagine if everyone shared this young refugee’s vision for the world



When Mustafa was just 13, he and his mother fled the war in Syria and survived a risky trip across the Mediterranean Sea to Europe. One year later, he was settling into his new life in Germany and facing a whole new challenge: would he fit in? Would his new community accept him?

Watch how Mustafa is embracing his next journey with a deep sense of empathy and compassion.

Stand by children in crisis


UNICEF Australia has an amazing group of supporters called Global Parents who make an ongoing pledge to protect and support children living in poverty and war zones. By signing up with a monthly gift, our Global Parents make a beautiful commitment: that wherever a child is born and whatever comes their way, we'll give them a life, a chance, a choice.

You can help us continue this critical work for kids, wherever the need is greatest.

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