Children in Gaza are in desperate need.
Donate today

Every year, World's Children Day is celebrated on 20 November, marking the date that the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child was adopted. 

The United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child is the most widely ratified human rights treaty in history and has helped transform children’s lives around the world. In fact, UNICEF plays a critical role in seeing that the rights of every child, no matter who they are or where they live, are realised.  

On World Children's Day, UNICEF Australia encourages children of all ages to make some noise about the issues that matter most to them. It is a moment of collective joy and celebration, bringing children from all over Australia – and the world – together. 

In the words of Millie Bobby Brown, “Today, young people don’t want to be talked about. They want to do the talking.”  

From the environment to gender equality and everything in between, we believe in giving young people a platform to stand up for what they believe is right, to have their voices heard and to advocate for their future.  

Just a kid

A minute of loudness for world children's day‍© UNICEF Australia/2023/Moran

Celebrating World Children’s Day

Children across Australia made noise for our climate on World Children’s Day as part of UNICEF Australia’s first-ever A Minute of Loudness. Thousands of children from about 180 schools around the country participated in activities to draw attention to how the climate crisis is impacting children in Australia, our region and globally. 

In the lead-up, participating schools were provided with classroom resources, activities and lesson plans to help them plan their World Children’s Day A Minute of Loudness, whether they talk, sing, clap, cheer, play instruments or raise signs. 

World Children's Day

School girls in Afghanistan exercising their right to an education.© UNICEF/UN0679805/Naftalin

What is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child?

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, or UNCRC, is a special agreement made by governments from all around the world (including Australia) to ensure every child, no matter who they are, where they live or what they believe, has rights.  

After listening and learning from the experts, most countries that make up the United Nations agreed on 54 different rights that every child under 18 should have to live a safe, healthy and happy life. In 1989, they signed this agreement, which we now know as the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. All the rights are connected, equally important and cannot be taken away from children. 

A child in Papua New Guinea exercising his right to access healthcare.© UNICEF Australia/2023/Moran

When is World Children’s Day celebrated? 

Every year, World Children’s Day is celebrated on 20 November because on that day in 1959, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Declaration of the Rights of the Child. Exactly 30 years later, on 20 November 1989, the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child. 

Children in Laos exercising their right to play. © UNICEF/UN0311132/Labrador

Why do we celebrate World Children’s Day?  

The Convention on the Rights of the Child is based on what a child needs to grow, learn and live a safe and healthy life with dignity and respect. It is for every child, regardless of gender, religion, culture or ethnicity - and this is worth celebrating! 

World Children’s Day, Wednesday, 20 November 2024

World Children’s Day, Wednesday, 20 November 2024

UNICEF Australia will be celebrating World Children’s Day with a Minute of Loudness. All schools across Australia are encouraged to register for their students but children of all ages are invited to get involved! 

When you register your school, you will receive classroom activities, lesson plans, promotional material and fundraising ideas.  

FAQs

World Children's Day is a global event celebrating children's rights on 20 November – marking the anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Children's Week in Australia is held in October, focusing on local community activities that promote children's wellbeing. 

World Children's Day is an annual celebration on 20 November, marking the anniversary of the creation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. It highlights the importance of children's rights, their wellbeing, and the need to amplify their voices for a brighter future. 

To get involved, just register your school! You'll then recieve access to a range of education resources, fundraising ideas and everything you need to know to host your school's Minute of Loudness.

Fundraising to help UNICEF support children around the world is a great way to add extra meaning to your World Children's Day celebrations.

From mufti days and bake sales, to a teacher student challenge. How you fundraise is completely up to you!

If your school would prefer not to fundraising, then that's totally okay! You're still able to join in the World Children's Day celebration and access some amazing resources.

Absolutely! Although we encourage everyone to fundraise online, we know that isn't always practical at school.

If you decide to fundraise offline, you can donate directly into UNICEF's bank account.

Account name: Australian Committee for UNICEF Ltd

BSB: 012010

Account: 837541992

Reference: School name

Once you've made a donation, please email teamuncief@unicef.org.au so we can provide a receipt.

No worries! Although we recommend 10am on 20 November, you are welcome to host your Minute of Loudness whenever suits your school best!

If you have any questions, from fundraising to technical issues with your page, please contact UNICEF Australia’s team at 1300 884 233 or email us at teamunicef@unicef.org.au